Event Date: 3-5 July 2014

Event Location: University of Lincoln, UK

To register, visit the conference Web page. The conference program is also available in draft form.

This conference seeks to explore and re-evaluate the forms and functions of networks and communities for men in the middle ages. We invite papers which consider these in relation to professed religious men and/or laymen of any faith.

Scholars are increasingly engaging with what religion, belief and devotion meant to men as men. Networks and communities both shape and express individual, relational, and collective identities, and therefore shed useful light on the experiences, perceptions or depiction of medieval men. This is the second conference under the auspices of The Bishop’s Eye Network – a research network between the Universities of Huddersfield and Lincoln. The first, ‘Religious Men in the Middle Ages’, was held at Huddersfield in 2012.

The conference will be held at the Brayford Campus, which is a few minutes’ walk from the train station, and within easy reach of the cathedral and castle. The conference organisers are Dr Philippa Hoskin and Dr Joanna Huntington. For further information on Lincoln, visit http://www.visitlincoln.com/

Event Date: 17-21 September 2014

Event Location: University of Zadar, Croatia

Submission Deadline: 25 April 2014

The question of church reforms has been repeatedly emerging in recent scholarship, from the early medieval monastic reform movements to the reforms promulgated by the Tridentine Council. While exploring the processes and effects of various ecclesiastical reforms, former studies did not specifically focus on a comparative analysis of the reforming actions and strategies. To this purpose, seeing the vast scholarly field covering the ecclesiastical reform movements, we have considered it necessary to establish certain parameters or comparative points that would serve as a basis for precise analysis. As one of the most important aspects of church history in general, the cult of saints could provide an adequate foothold for exploring the similarities and differences between various reformist strategies.

Following the already established tradition of Hagiotheca’s previous conferences exploring the relationship between the cult of the saints and diverse social, cultural, and political phenomena, the upcoming conference aims at juxtaposing the ways in which the church reformers approached the cult of the saints and used them in order to achieve their reformist goals. We propose to address three main problems: the creation of new cults, the suppression of new/old cults, and the transformation of the existing cults.
These problems can be tackled with the following, as well as any other subquestions:

  • What was the place of the saints’ cults in the chronology of a church reform? Were the cults involved in the reformist actions from the beginning, or strategically tackled at a later phase?
  • What were the actual strategical moves regarding the cults?
  • Was the creation/suppresion/transformation of the cults spreading from the top of the ecclesiastical hierarchy or was it rather capillary?
  • What was the role of popular devotion in these actions? What was the attitude of the reformed church towards the popular veneration of the reformist saints?
  • What was the role of the ˝future saints“ in these reforms, and in what ways did their own engagement eventually contribute to their canonisation?
  • Finally, how important was the cult of saints as a means of promoting of the reformist ideas?

We invite papers discussing the role of the saints’ cults in major church reforms, as well as their minor reflections, including, but not limited to:

  • Reforms and reform-like phenomena in Late Antiquity
  • Monastic refoms in the early Middle Ages (8th – 11th c.)
  • Gregorian and post-Gregorian reform of clerical life
  • Observant reforms – Mendicant orders, Benedictine Observance (Congregation of St Justine)
  • Reformation (including all the related late medieval movements)
  • Counter-Reformation (notably the Tridentine Council)

Proposals
We welcome 300-word abstracts of papers (20 minutes) and poster presentations (display requirements will be given later), with an additional short CV. The working language of the conference is English. All proposals will be reviewed by an international scientific commitee. Proposals should be sent by e-mail to reformsaints@gmail.com before 15 April 2014. Notification of acceptance will be sent by 25 April 2014. Publication of the proceedings in the series Bibliotheca Hagiotheca – Colloquia is planned for 2016 (for the previous proceedings, see http://www.leykam international.hr).

Conference Travel Info
The conference will take place at the University of Zadar, and will include keynote lectures (to be announced) and a guided visit to the medieval churches, museums and art collections of Zadar. A half-day excursion is planned for Sunday. The organisers offer accommodation for the participants at Hotel Kolovare (http://www.hotel kolovare.com/en/) at 40% discount. Alternative accommodation for a limited number of participants will be available at the University campus.

The participants are responsible for their own travel arrangements.

The registration fee is 60 EURO (40 EURO for doctoral students and independent researchers).

Conference organized by Croatian Hagiography Society Hagiotheca, University of Zadar, University of Turku -Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, University of Tampere – Hagiographica Septentrionalia

Scientific committee:
Mladen Ančić (University of Zadar)
Marjo Kaartinen (University of Turku – Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies)
Sari Katajala Peltomaa (University of Tampere – Hagiographica Septentrionalia)
Gábor Klaniczay (Central European University)
Ana Marinković (University of Zagreb – Hagiotheca)
Marika Räsänen (University of Turku – Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies)
Trpimir Vedriš (University of Zagreb – Hagiotheca)

Organising committee:
Teemu Immonen (University of Turku – Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies)
Ines Ivić (University of Zagreb – Hagiotheca)
Jenni Kuuliala (University of Bremen – Hagiographica Septentrionalia)
Ana Marinković (University of Zagreb – Hagiotheca)
Matko Matija Marušić (University of Zagreb – Hagiotheca)
Ana Mišković (University of Zadar)
Marika Räsänen (University of Turku – Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies)
Trpimir Vedriš (University of Zagreb – Hagiotheca)

Event date: 22-24 July 2014

Event location: University of Sheffield, UK

Submission deadline: 15 April 2014

Men and women have always expressed doubts about ideas and individual doctrines, but the means and the implications of doing so depend on historical circumstance. Having a crisis of faith in the post-Enlightenment nineteenth century, with its concept of ‘honest doubt’, had different socio-political consequences to a crisis of doubt in, say, the fourth or fourteenth centuries or the present era. These differences persist both at the level of our sources and in the nature or content of doubt, which has been deeply affected by changes in science and technology. Any history of a Church also needs to explore the changing means by which men and women in power have sought to maintain credibility while also dealing with incomplete information. Doubt, then, is clearly central to the history of Christianity.

Proposals are invited for twenty-minute papers tackling any aspect of this theme.

Ecclesiastical History Society
c/o dr Tim Grass
Email: tgrass.work@gmail.com

For complete details and a proposal form to accompany your proposal, see the website at http://www.history.ac.uk/ehsoc

The NEH Summer Seminar on Arts, Architecture, and Devotional Interaction, 1200-1600 will be held in York, England from June 8 to July 4, 2014. The seminar is designed to provide college and university teachers with an extraordinary opportunity to explore how and why artwork and architecture produced between 1200-1600 engaged devotees in dramatic new forms of physical and emotional interaction. Building on the work of scholars over the past decade, we will examine the role of performativity, sensual engagement, dynamic kinetic action as well as emotional and imaginative interaction within the arts.

The seminar will take full advantage of its spectacular locale. Most seminar meetings will be held in churches or museums and we will be accompanied by visiting scholars who are specialists in the daily topics. The seminar is designed for all kinds of teachers in the humanities, not just art historians. You do not need a specialist’s knowledge of English Gothic art and architecture, but we expect that participants will have some scholarly engagement with European history, art history, theology, theater, music, or some other appropriate field.

For further details, visit http://www.usu.edu/NEHseminar2014/

Application Deadline: 4 March 2014

Reform and Renewal in Medieval Rome is a five-week seminar for college and university faculty funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Held at the American Academy in Rome from June 23 to July 25, 2014, it offers significant opportunities for independent research in the city’s libraries and archives as well as a collaborative exploration of both secular and religious movements for renewal and reform in medieval Europe.

Directed by Maureen C. Miller (University of California, Berkeley) and William L. North (Carleton College), the seminar will use the rich history of the city and its surviving medieval monuments as a laboratory for reconsidering central concepts in European history that continue to be powerful elements of our public discourse. Indeed, “reform” and “renewal” seem to be almost passwords for legitimate and positive transformation. With its repeated movements for religious and political reform and renewal, the Middle Ages offers a particularly rich historical landscape in which to investigate these processes. Through readings, site visits, and discussions, the seminar seeks to foster participants’ individual research and pedagogical projects and to build a supportive interdisciplinary community of inquiry that will continue to share ideas, work, and teaching materials after the summer ends. Theoretical readings on the dynamics of conceptual and institutional change will be paired with three richly documented, interdisciplinary case studies: the Carolingian political, religious, and intellectual transformations of the ninth century; ecclesiastical reform in the eleventh and twelfth centuries; and the efforts to revive the Roman republic in both the twelfth and the fourteenth centuries. Readings include theoretical discussions of the conceptual and institutional dynamics of reform, core primary sources for each of the cases studies, as well as a range of classic and revisionist scholarship. Site visits in and around Rome – for example, to S. Clemente, S. Prassede, SS. Quattro Coronati, S. Angelo in Formis, the Lateran, and the Campidoglio – are designed to put texts into conversation with visual and material evidence.

The directors encourage applications from scholars engaged in research and teaching on reform and renewal throughout medieval Europe, but also welcome those in Renaissance studies, for which the medieval movements of reform and renewal are an essential foundation, and those pursuing comparative projects on these themes. In addition to the unparalleled resources of Rome’s numerous archives, libraries, sites, and museums, participants may also be aided by the American Academy’s own library and research facilities. The application deadline is March 4, 2014. For further details, visit https://apps.carleton.edu/neh2014/

The University of Oxford’s history faculty seeks a postdoc research faculty to begin 1 Feb 2014 and work on the project ‘The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide study of its origins, spread and development’, directed by Dr Bryan Ward-Perkins and funded by a €2.3 million ERC Advanced Grant (2014-18).

For more information, visit the post-doc posting (http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AHU605/research-associate-the-cult-of-saints-latin/)

Event date: 7-10 July 2014

Event location: Leeds, UK

Submission deadline: 15 Sept 2013

EPISCOPUS, in partnership with Conventus, is happy to announce a call for papers for six sessions at Leeds in 2014.

Episcopus/Conventus sponsored sessions

  1. Setting up an emperor’s church I: Henry II and his bishops. Organizer: Evan Gatti, chair: Steven Vanderputten
  2. Bishops’ modes of inclusion and exclusion in the long eleventh century: rituals, performances, enactments. Organizer: Steven Vanderputten, chair: John Ott
  3. It runs in the family. Long-standing occupation of abbatial and episcopal sees by aristocratic clans (tenth-early twelfth centuries). Organizer: Organizer: Brigitte Meijns, chair: Steven Vanderputten

Conventus/Episcopus sponsored sessions

  1. Setting up an emperor’s church II: Henry II and his abbots. Organizer: Steven Vanderputten, chair: Diane Reilly
  2. Intellectual culture and reform in tenth-century female monasticism. Organizer: Diane Reilly, chair: Evan Gatti

Conventus sponsored sessions

  1. Immigrants in the Empire (tenth-twelfth centuries). Organizer: Diane Reilly, chair: Steven Vanderputten

Please submit your proposal (title + abstract) before Sept. 15 to Pieter.Byttebier@ugent.be. The full CFP for Leeds is available at http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2014_call.html.

Event Date: 3-5 July 2014

Event Location: University of Lincoln, UK

Submission deadline: 30 September 2013

This conference seeks to explore and re-evaluate the forms and functions of networks and communities for men in the middle ages. We invite papers which consider these in relation to professed religious men and/or laymen of any faith.

Scholars are increasingly engaging with what religion, belief and devotion meant to men as men. Networks and communities both shape and express individual, relational, and collective identities, and therefore shed useful light on the experiences, perceptions or depiction of medieval men. This is the second conference under the auspices of The Bishop’s Eye Network – a research network between the Universities of Huddersfield and Lincoln. The first, ‘Religious Men in the Middle Ages’, was held at Huddersfield in 2012.

We invite abstracts from scholars at all career stages working on the interplay between men in networks and communities; how they are constituted and what they mean. Papers may focus on homosocial networks and communities or male involvement in female networks and communities.

Topics for discussion could include networks and communities defined by:

  • Family and kinship
  • Intellectual connections (e.g. textual communities, scholasticism)
  • Profession and Occupation
  • Orders, universities, monastic, mendicant, and secular houses
  • Patronage and affinity
  • Geography and location
  • Guilds and confraternities
  • Military experience (e.g. comitati, warbands, orders of chivalry)
  • Friendship and emotional bonds (e.g. amicitia, love)
  • Ethnicity and inter-cultural encounters

Papers could consider individuals or groups from any faith, religious tradition, monotheistic, pagan, or heretical, or could focus on men who rejected religion and faith. We encourage proposals from scholars working in any relevant field: history, literature and language, art history, musicology, archaeology, etc., and from any medieval period (c. 500–early 1500s) or geographical setting.

The conference will be held at the Brayford Campus, which is a few minutes’ walk from the train station, and within easy reach of the cathedral and castle. The conference organisers are Dr Philippa Hoskin and Dr Joanna Huntington. For further information on Lincoln, visit http://www.visitlincoln.com/. (A conference website is under construction).

We hope to publish a volume of essays based on a selection of the papers delivered at the conference.

Proposals, of 200-300 words, for papers of 20 minutes, should be submitted to
bishopseye2014@gmail.com by 30 September 2013.

Event Date: May 8-11, 2014

Event Location: Kalamazoo, MI

Submission Deadline: September 15, 2013

Episcopus is pleased to sponsor three panels at next year’s International Medieval Congress at Kalamazoo, to be held

  1. Rethinking Reform I : The Portrayal of Religious Change in Gesta and Vitae Episcoporum and Abbatum (organized by Maureen Miller, UC Berkeley, and William North, Carleton College; please send an abstract and a Participant Information Form directly mcmiller@berkeley.edu and wnorth@carleton.edu.)
      Research on reform in the eleventh and twelfth centuries has, for some time now, expressed dissatisfaction with our standard narratives of this period in ecclesiastical history. In attempting to formulate more compelling interpretations, the Rethinking Reform panels at the 2012 and 2013 Congresses have identified the need to focus closely on the medieval vocabulary (corrigere, emendare, rinnovare, repristinare, etc.) often interpreted as “reform” and the varied purposes for which it is used. Building on the productive discussions sparked by our 2013 sessions on narratives of reform in individual sources (Textual Perspectives), we invite proposals for 2014 focused on the language and narratives of religious change found specifically in the genres of episcopal vitae or gestae episcoporum or abbatum. When and how does language denoting correction, emendation, renovation, or reform appear in these genres? What tropes of rebirth, improvement, or return to ancient ideals recur, and what actions and qualities are characterized or associated with such rhetoric? To what ends or purposes is such language deployed: why are discourses of reform invoked? Comparisons of examples within one genre or between the two are welcome, as are papers considering change and continuity across a wide chronology.
  2. Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Diocese of Lincoln, ca. 1209-1521 (co-sponsored with The Bishop’s Eye Research Network, Universities of Lincoln and Huddersfield, UK)
      The diocese of Lincoln was not only the largest in England — spread over eight counties — but an ongoing focal point of ecclesiastical change in administrative, spiritual, and political development in the country. This session will trace some of these developments across three hundred years in the diocese, bringing together scholars from North America and the UK, under the auspices of both Episcopus and The Bishop’s Eye, a UK research network based at the Universities of Huddersfield and Lincoln devoted to the medieval diocese of Lincoln and the relationship of masculinity and religion. Participation by members of The Bishop’s Eye research group is expected. The session will encourage papers which not only focus on particular clergy and clerical communities, but also situate them in broader political, cultural, gendered, and/or economic contexts.
  3. Milestones and Watersheds in the Scholarship and Study of the Medieval Church and Secular Clergy from the Nineteenth Century to the Present
      The study of medieval bishops and the secular clergy has undergone tremendous development and refinement over the last century. At the same time, much research still remains to be done on all aspects of church history (Van Engen, 2002). How have our views evolved and changed over time? What works and/or scholars have been instrumental in pushing the field in different directions, and why? Where do we go from here? This panel invites papers that explore specific historiographical milestones, catalysts, and watersheds in the field of medieval church history (with a focus on the secular clergy), their legacy, and the past and present implications for scholarship. Historiographical contributions from non-anglophone scholarly traditions are warmly encouraged.

These sessions are listed in the PDF that contains the full ICMS CFP.

Paper proposals are due September 15, 2013. Please send an abstract and a Participant Information Form to ott@pdx.edu unless otherwise directed in the session listing.

Event Date: 28 Aug 2013

Event Location: Zurich, Switzerland

The Final Conference Program is now available. Questions and queries about the conference programme can be directed to Matthew Mesley, University of Zurich, (matthew.mesley@uzh.ch)

From antiquity to modernity, pre-modern ruling systems in different parts of the world often shared a common feature: the participation of men who were either physically unable or normatively forbidden to father children. One the one hand, there were the childless eunuchs who fulfilled a variety of functions at courts in the Middle East, Byzantium and China; they were much more than simply guardians of the harem. Due to their specific “gender”, the eunuchs formed an integral part of the different ruling systems; indeed, they held a central position in court politics, and their loyalty towards the reigning dynasty was not conditional on nepotism or favouritism towards their family, since they were childless. On the other hand, we have the ruling priests: the celibate bishops both in the Byzantine Empire and Latin Europe. Whereas the Eastern Church tolerated eunuchs as priests, the Western Church demanded that a priest was not castrated, and that instead he needed to have the willpower and resolve to remain celibate. Bishops, who formed an integral part of the ruling elites in both the Western and Eastern were subject to the same rules surrounding celibacy, and were prevented in theory from fathering legitimate children.

Without aiming at a strict comparison between the two groups, this conference wants to take the phenomenon of pre-modern ruling systems that incorporate celibate or childless men, as a starting point in order to address the following questions:

(1)  What were the political and economical consequences of integrating men who were childless or without any legitimate children into the ruling elites and the respective networks of family and kinship?

(2)  If we take the definition of gender by R. Connell in his classic study on Masculinities (Gender as a social practice in relation to the “reproductive arena”), we might expect specific gender conceptions for both priests and eunuchs. How should we view these men: as a third gender; a hybrid gender; or as an asexual gender? Were they always gendered in a specific way or only in certain contexts or environments? And how did the actors perceive their own role in this respect? Is gender still “a useful tool of historical analysis” (Joan Scott) even, or should we adopt different approaches?

(3)  What was the relationship between these men and a divinely legitimized rule in respect to sacredness?

In asking these questions, this conference aims to shed light on the culture of political rule in a period before a strict biological dichotomy of the sexes might be said to have existed. We hope that the ensuing discussion and debate will open up new perspectives on the connections, parallels and peculiarities that can be discovered between rule and gender on a pre-modern global level. The papers will explore such themes within the Middle East, the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity and Byzantium, Latin Europe, China and other geographic areas.

The conference will be held at the University of Zurich between Wednesday 28th August – 30th August, 2013. Registration, which will be free, will begin at 2.30pm on Wednesday.

Accommodation and transport queries should be sent to Serena Tolino, University of Zürich, (serena.tolino@uzh.ch)

For more information, visit http://events.history.ac.uk/event/show/8993